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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time being give him sweeping powers without any oversight for the next several months. he says these moves are an effort to move forward the democratic process and to draft a constitution. his opponents describe it as an undemocratic power grab, and now this face-off is taking shape. one of mr. morsi's advisers quitting today, the supreme court judicial council, the body that represents the top judges, held an emergency meeting today w
judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president for us. >> is it possible to rescind his decrees? >> we have had a dialogue. >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president and we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step to forward, not to backward. >> reporter: as you heard, we pressed them on the why reasonable degree idea of the president
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
between security forces and protesters, tear gas. and we're moving away. as the protests intensified, mr. morsy appealed for calm. in a speech hundreds of his supporters who gathered outside the presidential palace in cairo, he defended his decrees and rejected accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear path, a path that achieves a clear goal. >> reporter: throughout the early morning hours, there were pockets of clashes and the injuries continue to pile-up and many demonstrators pitched tents in the square, an indication that these demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >> rez rez sesayia in cairo. >> sad news from the world of entertainment. larry hagman has died. his family says he died of complications from cancer. >> we look forward to having everybody in "dallas" laughing at you because they know you'll have to come crawling to j.r. >> j.r. ewing, one of the best known tv characteristics of the last 40 years. "dallas" was a long-running hit in the '70s and '80s. he c
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
department. >> were you for warrant that mr. mursi was going to do this? -- were you forewarned mr. morsi was going to do this? >> these are separate issues. we have raised our concerns and that, i think in party answers your question. secretary clinton is focused on working with the president down others, prime minister netanyahu, to help bring about a ceasefire and other allies can be saved and the possibility of moving forward on negotiations for more enduring peace could be realized. that was very important. the president played a very important role in that. separately, we have raised concerns about some of the decisions and declarations made on november 22nd and we continue to engage on this with the egyptians. the important thing is that the egyptian people want a government that reflects their will and we accept that. >> it was murky before thanksgiving. can you clarify the $4 trillion in debt as a reduction of over 10 years? >> it is reflected in his budget proposals that i know you all have read covered cover and is still the most substantive proposal by an elected official that
of in this is specifically going into -- [inaudible] and one-third of that into gaza. >> mr. martin hallward. >> congratulate morsi of egypt on his moderating role, but also his advice to vote yes to the recognition of pal the tin yang states at the united nations, thereby demonstrating some small progress for those palestinians promoting the path of diplomacy, not violence. >> well, this is the debate that we entered into earlier. now, i've had this discussion with my egyptian counterparts a couple of times already, understandably, and as i say, there's a wholly legitimate point of view about that. my judgment is that it's important to do whatever is necessary to support a return to negotiations and that a vote now in the general assembly does not support that. so that is the government's considered view. we will continue to discuss this with our european partners as to how we should respond to the actual vote. >> jeremy corbin. >> could the foreign secretary have a word with the undersecretary of state who is apparently in ramallah today and in israel yesterday and to suggest that he goes on to visit gaza
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)